Art History 307

Early Chinese Art: From Antiquity to the Tenth Century

Introduces art forms and concepts developed from antiquity to mid-10th century, covering jade carving, metalwork, sculpture, ceramics, calligraphy, painting, woodblock printing, and architecture. Emerging aesthetic concepts also discussed.

This course will introduce art forms and concepts that developed in China from remote antiquity to the mid-10th century. The artworks that survive from this long period were created primarily in the contexts of funerary culture and religion, while knowledge of art made for other purposes is based on texts. Organized chronologically, the course will examine the materials, techniques, and functions of the most important artistic media in each period. These media will include including jade-carving, metalwork, sculpture, ceramics, calligraphy, painting, woodblock printing, and architecture. We will also consider the aesthetic concepts and social groups associated with the various art forms.

The course has two meetings per week, at which attendance will be taken. In general, the first class in each section of the syllabus will be a lecture overview, and others will focus on more specific aspects and allow more class participation. The goals are to foster in-depth understanding of art historical developments in early China and to encourage students to develop skills and confidence in analyzing, describing, and comparing visual forms. You do not need to know Chinese for this course, but I will expect you to become familiar with important names and terms. . 

(Li | TR 11:00-12:15 | L140 Elvehjem Building)

Open to Freshmen. I; 3 cr (H-E).