College of Letters & Science

Lecture

 

kroiz

Prof. Lauren Kroiz (University of California, Berkeley) discusses the Wisconsin origins of her new book, Cultivating Citizens: The Regional Work of Art in the New Deal Era. Her lecture centers on the University of Wisconsin’s Rural Art Program, which began at UW’s College of Agriculture in the late 1930s and continues into the present. She considers the contributions of Regionalist painter John Steuart Curry, rural sociologist John Rector Barton, art history professor Oskar Hagen, and rural artists including Earl Sugden, Alice Weber, and Millie Rose Lalk. Reception to follow in Paige Court. Sponsored by the Department of Art History (the James Watrous fund) with co-sponsorship from the Chazen Museum of Art.

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Event Date
Venue
Chazen Auditorium
Blocker

Jane Blocker's lecture, “Echo: Sound Recording and Racial Violence in Contemporary Art History” looks back to the infamously politicized 1993 Whitney Biennial and its inclusion of the amateur video showing five white police officers beating Rodney King, to consider the ways in which recorded sound serves as historical document. It draws together critical reactions to the Biennial, the performance practice of Anna Deavere Smith, and the story of Echo to think about the effect of racial violence on historical temporalities.

STUDENT WORKSHOP
Thursday, April 5
2:30 – 4p
Elvehjem L170

The student workshop will focus on Professor Blocker’s latest research alongside her 2015 publication, “History in the Present Progressive: Sonic Imposture at The Pedicord Apts.”

Readings for the workshop and registration are located at https://cvc.wisc.edu/programs/jane-blocker/

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Event Date
Venue
Elvehjem L140

 

symposium

Join us for a multi-sensorial exhibition displaying the sights, sounds, and motions of Egúngún Arts, and a multi-disciplinary Symposium exploring sensory aspects of specific African ways of honoring ancestors on April 6-7. This event is sponsored by the African Studies Program and the Department of Art History, with co-sponsorship from the Anonymous Fund, the institute for Regional and Institutional Studies (IRIS), and the Ruth Davis Design Gallery.

Please visit https://whirlingancestors.wisc.edu/schedule/ for more information.

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Event Date
Category
Event Date
Venue
Chazen Museum Auditorium
Hélio Oiticica manipulating B11 Bólide Caixa 9 (B11 Box Bolide 9), 1964. Rio de Janeiro.
Hélio Oiticica manipulating B11 Bólide Caixa 9 (B11 Box Bolide 9), 1964. Rio de Janeiro.


In this talk Dr. Monica Amor (Associate Professor, MICA) will return to the concept of the trans-object (which Hélio Oiticica developed in 1963) to articulate the performative dimension of the work that followed the Neoconcrete inquiry of the 1959-1961 period. This performative turn coincided, as is well known, with Oiticica’s incursion into the favela of Mangueira in Rio de Janeiro and was theorized in relation to the concept of “work-environment” and the notion of “vivência” (life-experience). Interested in comparing this emphasis on “vivência” to the “experiential”—which art historian Dorothea Von Hantelmann relates to the art of the sixties and the rise of the experience society—Professor Amor will propose some venues of investigation that concern material that she is exploring with students in the Exhibition Development Seminar at MICA where this semester they continue work on an exhibition entitled Counternarratives: Performance and Actions in Public Space.

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Event Date
Venue
Elvehjem Building L140