College of Letters & Science

Student

New Graduate Student Publication

Landscapes, Natures, Ecologies: Italy and the Environmental Humanities
Sophia Maxine Farmer's chapter "Aeropittura: Modern Aviation and the Fascist Idealization of the Italian Landscape" has been published in the peer-reviewed collective volume Landscapes, Natures, Ecologies: Italy and the Environmental Humanities edited by Enrico Cesaretti, Serenella Iovino, and Elena Past by the University of Virginia Press.

Bringing together new writing by some of the field’s most compelling voices from the United States and Europe, Landscapes, Natures, Ecologies: Italy and the Environmental Humanities is the first book to examine Italy--as a territory of both matter and imagination--through the lens of the environmental humanities. The contributors offer a wide spectrum of approaches--including ecocriticism, film studies, environmental history and sociology, eco-art, and animal and landscape studies--to move past cliché and reimagine Italy as a hybrid, plural, eloquent place. Among the topics investigated are post-seismic rubble and the stratifying geosocial layers of the Anthropocene, the landscape connections in the work of writers such as Calvino and Buzzati, the contaminated fields of the ecomafia’s trafficking, Slow Food’s gastronomy of liberation, poetic birds and historic forests, resident parasites, and nonhuman creatures.

At a time when the tension between the local and the global requires that we reconsider our multiple roots and porous place-identities, Italy and the Environmental Humanities builds a creative critical discourse and offers a series of new voices that will enrich not just nationally oriented discussions, but the entire debate on environmental culture.

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Please save the date for the Art History Undergraduate Honors Thesis colloquium and reception. Four students will showcase their faculty-nominated work on Thursday, April 26th from 2:30 - 4 p.m. in room L170 Elvehjem, with a reception to follow in the Hagen Room.

  • Stuart Deets will be presenting The Persistence of Ritual in Feminist Performance Art and his advisor is Prof. Shira Brisman
  • Yusi Liu will be presenting Between Bushes and Bathrooms: Sanitation in Ancient Greek Households and her advisor is Prof. Nick Cahill
  • Alexa Machnik will be presenting Deifying Beauty: Yang Guifei's Cultural Legacy and Manifestation as Kannon in Sennyu-ji Temple and her advisor is Prof. Yuhang Li
  • Hoyon Mephokee will be presenting Dancers, Warriors, and the Body on Display: Deconstructing Jean-Léon Gérôme’s Orientalism and his advisor is Prof. Nancy Rose Marshall
Honors Thesis Colloquium

 

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L170 Elvehjem

Please join us for the Department's annual graduation reception at 3:00 p.m. on May 11th at the University Club. We will celebrate our graduating seniors as well as graduates of the M.A. and Ph.D. programs. Please RSVP to Teddy Kaul at ejkaul@wisc.edu

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University Club

Kramer Appointed to CAA SEPC Committee

cortney

Cortney Anderson Kramer was appointed to a three year professional service term on the College Art Association Student and Emerging Professionals Committee (SEPC). One of nine professional committees, SEPC is comprised of CAA members who are students, beginning professionals, and experienced professionals with the intention of better representing students and emerging professionals within the larger CAA and academic framework.

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During this workshop, everyone will be able to create and perform in their own Parangolés made with fabrics, paints, glue, and more. These colorful and fun costumes will be inspired by Brazilian art, music, and carnival celebration. Participants will be invited to join a public performance on March 15th.

Carnival & Performance Workshop

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Mead Witter Lobby, Chazen Art Museum

Join Prof. Ann Smart Martin and her students at the Opening of "What's in a Jug? Art, Technology, Culture" at the Chazen Museum of Art on Thursday, March 1st, from 5:30 - 8:00 p.m.

What's in a Jug?

We see water bottles everywhere today. But before the invention of plastic, ceramic jugs were the common vessels used to carry liquids. The stoneware jugs in this exhibition were made with molded deep relief ornament that depicted nature and told stories. Common on many tables in Victorian England, these jugs were made by factory labor using new technologies and represented high design in the applied arts of the mid-nineteenth century.

How were they used? Just like today, they carried liquids and contained clues about art, technology and culture. Available in multiple sizes and easily broken, each household may have owned more than one jug to carry out domestic tasks. Families also probably used them to carry beer home from public houses (pubs). Some jugs were so ornate and three-dimensional that they may never have contained liquids at all, but rested on a mantelpiece or table-top to be admired.

This exhibition is broken into four sections. The first part explores the techniques of making, especially the abundant use of molds to ornament an everyday item. A second section examines Victorian ideas about artful design and its moral benefits, especially for the working class. A third grouping delves into the meanings of molded patterns. Finally, the closing area turns to people, pointing to the harsh conditions for factory workers as well as the joy of the collector of these vessels.

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Chazen Museum of Art

Graduate Student Curates Exhibition

Francis Davis Millet (American, 1846–1912), Study for Proclaiming the King, 1901, oil on canvas, 20 x 27 in., Chazen Museum of Art, gift of D. Frederick Baker from the Baker/Pisano Collection, 2017.27.54
Francis Davis Millet (American, 1846–1912), Study for Proclaiming the King, 1901, oil on canvas, 20 x 27 in., Chazen Museum of Art, gift of D. Frederick Baker from the Baker/Pisano Collection, 2017.27.54

The Tile Club: Camaraderie and American Plein-Air Painting

February 23 to May 20 | Leslie and Johanna Garfield Galleries


The Tile Club was one of many societies that formed across the United States during the late nineteenth century. Including such well-known artists as Winslow Homer, William Merritt Chase, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Edwin Austin Abbey, J. Alden Weir, and John H. Twachtman, the club was founded in 1877 riding a wave of interest in the decorative arts. Members met once a week and would each contribute to the “decorative age” by painting an eight-by-eight-inch ceramic tile. These meetings became a time to socialize, dine, and enjoy the music performed by guests and honorary members.

Tiles formed only a small part of the Club’s output. Members made excursions to Long Island and up the Hudson River to sketch and paint. These trips were lively journeys, and the works completed during them document the first plein-air painting organization in the young nation. Tiles, paintings, sculptures, and sketches—many by distinguished artists working early in their careers—are showcased in this exhibition.

Free Public Programs

Thursday, March 1, 2018

  • 5:30–8 p.m. Reception for The Tile Club: Camaraderie and American Plein-Air Painting and Art History Curatorial Studies. Live music, refreshments, fun, and the premiere of Lovey Town.

Thursday, April 14, 2018

  • 12–2 p.m. ART•SPIN Mead Witter Lobby
    Put on your walking shoes and take a trip to Lovey Town – a place where BIG imagination lives in miniature works of art! Meet the Mayor of Lovey Town, Michael Velliquette, and work together to create whimsical paper dolls of none other than YOU! Free family friendly FUN!

 

 

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The Tile Club: Camaraderie and American Plein-Air Painting, curated by PhD Candidate Ann Glasscock, will open at the Chazen Museum of Art this Thursday, March 1, 2018 from 5:30 to 8 pm! Live music, refreshments, fun, and the premiere of Lovey Town!

LEARN MORE >>

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Mead Witter Lobby and Paige Court @ the Chazen Museum